Tag Archives: mobile applications

Just add water and this squid-inspired plastic heals itself

While you've been busy scarfing down fried calamari rings, scientists at the University of Pennsylvania have been doing something else with squid. Namely? Studying the cephalopod's ring teeth for a way to create a material that heals when water's p...

Key and Peele’s Spoof of Neil deGrasse Tyson Was Astronomically Brilliant

Tonight’s episode of Key & Peele was pretty geeky overall—there was a long sequence about Game of Thrones, which would have been the best bit of any normal episode. But the penultimate Key & Peele also included a fricken brilliant running gag about Neil deGrasse Tyson’s Cosmos.

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Android is Finally Getting a Standalone Street View App

Street View has always been a separate file on your Android device — it even gets its own Play Store listing — but up until now, you got to it through the Maps app.

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Hackaday Prize Semifinalist: Low Cost Radiography

For the past year, [Adam] has been working full-time on developing a low-cost x-ray system for developing nations. He has more than 3,500 hours into the project. A few months ago, we announced the 2015 Hackaday Prize, with a theme of, ‘build something that matters.’ A low-cost x-ray would certainly matter to the two-thirds of the world’s population that does not have access to medical radiography, making this project a great entry for The Hackaday Prize.

[Adam]’s portable x-ray system consists of an x-ray tube encased in an epoxied, 3D printed enclosure filled with dialectric oil. This tube is tucked away inside a beautiful case with just a single 12VDC input and an easy to understand user manual. This is just very high voltages and x-rays, nothing [Adam] hasn’t handled (safely) before. The real trick is in the imaging, and for this, [Adam] is using a phosphor screen to turn that x-ray exposure into something visible, an off the shelf x-ray sensor, and a prism to adapt the sensor to the phosphor screen.

The results are incredible. After taking a few pictures of what he had on hand, [Adam] can see the bond wires inside the microprocessor of a calculator. That’s more than sufficient for medical imaging – the goal of the project – and cheap enough to send it to the far-flung reaches of the planet.

The 2015 Hackaday Prize is sponsored by:


Filed under: The Hackaday Prize

Sony settles with employees affected by massive data breach

Sony Entertainment has reached a deal with its employees affected by the security breach that rocked its world in 2014. If you recall, that incident led to several waves of data leaks, including unreleased movies and juicy emails between its execs....

Philips’ Smartphone-Controlled Lightstrips Now Do Natural White Light

At some point in their life everyone has to grow up, and the same goes for Philips’ flexible Hue Lightstrips. Once the perfect way to subtly turn your living room into a colorful rave, the LED strips can now be tuned to generate more natural white light for reading the paper, or just relaxing with some knitting.

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Go Complete XKCD’s Random Quiz in the Name of Arbitrary Science

Most surveys are written with the intent of finding something out. The XKCD survey, written by stick-cartoonist extraordinaire Randall Munroe, doesn’t have an end game — it’s just trying to collect random information from as many people as possible, and then find unlikely correlations.

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PlayStation 3’s free-to-play ‘Soul Calibur’ shuts down in November

There was a brief period when Bandai Namco was trying a free-to-play model for its bigger franchises like the venerable Soul Calibur fighting series and its arcadey Ridge Racer. The latter shut down in 2014, and the former will suffer a similar fat...